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Daily news

Post Reports

Unparalleled reporting, expert insight, clear analysis: Everything you’ve come to expect from The Post newsroom, for your ears. Published weekdays by 5 p.m. Eastern time.

What I love about working at The Washington Post is hearing the first-hand, human accounts of the story “behind” the news — and that’s what we share with our audience on Post Reports. Listeners hear directly from reporters who are watching history unfold in real-time around the world … and they build a trusted relationship with the voices of our journalists. That trust is invaluable to us. Support our work and subscribe today.
— Martine Powers, host

Martine Powers

This seven-part investigative series follows an Alabama woman’s decision to come forward with a sexual-assault claim against a high-ranking figure in the D.C. criminal justice system, and the spiraling effects of that choice.

As an investigative reporter, I’ve always felt like we need to share more with our readers and listeners about how we do our jobs. So when we set out to make an investigative podcast, we knew it was important to pull back the curtain on our process. We wanted to show how we verify information, how we interview and why all of these steps are important. That’s why it’s been so meaningful to get emails from listeners who felt a strong connection to the series. I’m so grateful to our listeners and subscribers for supporting this type of investigative journalism.

— Amy Brittain, host

Amy Brittain

Politics deep dive

Can He Do That?


“Can He Do That?” is The Washington Post’s politics podcast exploring the powers and limitations of American government in an era of deep division.

This moment in our country has raised so many critical questions about how our government is supposed to function. It’s so important to listen to those questions from our audience and offer in-depth answers and clarity, amid chaos. That relationship with our listeners — that chance to serve as a meaningful resource — is why we make this show, and what I love most about it.

— Allison Michaels, host

Allison Michaels

In-depth interviews

Cape Up

​​From Washington Post Opinions, Jonathan Capehart talks with newsmakers who challenge your ideas on politics, and explore how race, religion, age, gender and cultural identity are redrawing the lines that both divide and unite America.

My listeners love that I ask questions and get out of the way during my extended conversation with a guest. And there are two reactions that I treasure: There’s the listener who is thrilled about being introduced to someone they’ve never heard of on a subject they care about; then there’s the listener who is excited to learn more about someone they thought they already knew. Support that work by subscribing.

— Jonathan Capehart, host

Jonathan Capehart

An American history journey

Presidential

​​​​The Post's “Presidential” podcast takes listeners on an epic historical journey through the personality and legacy of each American president, featuring interviews with the country’s top experts on the presidency.

Great journalism doesn’t just capture the news of the day, it helps explain why those events are unfolding around us. Often, that requires telling big, complex stories that span the long arc of American history. I love that The Post supports this kind of work: in-depth podcasts like ‘Presidential,’ ‘Constitutional’ and ‘Moonrise’ that reexamine the evolution of our democracy. Projects of such scale take a massive commitment of time and resources — and, most of all, a commitment to public service — which is why I’m so grateful when listeners tell me they’ve subscribed because they deeply value the podcasts we create.

— Lillian Cunningham, host

Lillian Cunningham
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